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Thread: Is TDS 250 too high for sulawesi shrimps?

  1. #1
    feiyang
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    Default Is TDS 250 too high for sulawesi shrimps?

    I am setting up a sulawesi tank now. I use crushed coral as my substrate, and the TDS is 250 now, and keep raising. My PH is 7.8.

    Is my TDS too high for sulawesi shrimps? I plan to try with White spot first.

    I heard sulawesi shrimps like high PH and low TDS/GH water, what substrate do you use to get that?

    Any comments are appreciated.

  2. #2
    ex imke_j's Avatar
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    Hi,

    I have had Goldflake shrimps for a while and if I should do a set up again, I would use fine lava and a undergravel filter in combination with an external filter (and coral chips in it). It is wise to use 100% RO water when starting the tank and bring in air to get the pH higher. In my experience, pH around 7.5 and TDS max. 400 is also okay; but the last shouldn't be higher anymore.

    Joydiv has posted water parameters of the lakes in this thread.
    http://www.shrimpnow.com/forum/show...3&postcount=27
    Perhaps this thread is useful for you, too:
    http://www.shrimpnow.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4613

    So overall: If you keep TDS as low as you can, that's the best. But shrimps can also adapt to a slight higher TDS. Good water quality (=low bacteria) is a must, so don't overfeed them.

    Imke
    Last edited by imke_j; 21st Feb 2010 at 02:06 PM. Reason: spelling

  3. #3
    feiyang
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    Thanks imke_j, those are very good reference. I read online that many people say lava rocks will not raise PH. I will try to get some and find out, I guess different rocks will have different effects on water.

    I also think about Caribsea's African Cichlid eco-complete substrate, which will keep PH in 8+. Does anybody have any experience with it? Thanks.

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    ex imke_j's Avatar
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    Default Sulawesi habitat pics

    Perhaps a bit offtopic but useful when setting up a new Sulawesi tank are these pics of natural habitats:
    http://equator.web.fc2.com/indonesia-sulawesi-danao.htm
    http://s211.photobucket.com/albums/b...g/Sulawesi09/?

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  6. #5
    feiyang
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    I just realized that my tap water is perfect: PH 8.2, TDS 90.

    I have spent months to investigate into sand, gravels, crushed coral, live sand, black sands, 3M sands, driftwood and plant for high PH, and waited over months to see the trend and final state. I have a small amount of crushed coral in a cup of water, its TDS has reached 450. It definitely not good for sulawesi shrimps I believe, even though shrimps may adapt to it, (maybe in a hard way).

    Well, after all of this, I tried some lava rock, rock outside of walkway, and some other rocks from a garden store... Lava rock raises TDS again, slowly but don't know where it ends. Other rocks does not raise TDS. And, I have to admit my tap water is just perfect than the water I tried to keep high PH and low TDS...

    Sigh, I should just be lazy and use tap water at the beginning....

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    Quote Originally Posted by feiyang View Post
    I just realized that my tap water is perfect: PH 8.2, TDS 90.
    ...
    Sigh, I should just be lazy and use tap water at the beginning....
    That's life - sometimes we make needless detour to succeed. The positive effect is that you collected precious experiences and shared them with us.

  8. #7
    feiyang
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    My sulawesi shrimp tank design

    - well, it was my sulawesi shrimp tank, but i have decided to remove the driftwood and crushed coral.

    - driftwood brought down PH a lot, especially for a 10 gallon tank. So, i decided to take it out. Moss and Mini pellia look ok in high PH water.

    - will keep rocks in the tank. Tap water is PH 9.2, TDS 90 (used to be 40 a few months ago), so I think it is a perfect water for sulawesi tank, at least much better than any water I "adjusted" with substrate.

    - "You are only allowed to post URLs to other sites after you have made 15 posts or more." ok, I will work on that...

  9. #8
    BiggestShrimp
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    Remember TDS is an elctrical conductive measure of all the ions in the water. This could be many things Calcium, magnesium, sodium and even the tannins leached from bog wood. I think the lakes of sulawesi have a low TDS of 90 which could be many things not just a measure of hardness or one specific thing, its a measure of every thing. I would say that over all TDS is not really what you should monitor, it is the actual component you are measureing such as hardness or KH.

    for example if you have a sulawesi tank with with really acidic soft water, 30 ppm, and you decided to add buffers to raise the pH then the salts you add to the water would increase the TDS but not the hardness which would remain at 30 but total TDS could be 500 after salts. Even in this situation I think the shrimp will survive as long as the buffers are not harmful to the fish. Coral which is made of Calcium carbonate in an acidic tank will always be degraded slowly by the acid in the water creating ions in the water slowly increasing TDS, in this example creating calcium ions would increase the hardness of the water. I hope this helps.

  10. #9
    feiyang
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    I agree with you Biggestshrimp. Same TDS number doesn't mean the ions in water are same. But since it is almost impossible to mix ingredients and match to Lake Motana's water, the target would be to be as close as possible for as many parameters as possible, reasonable?

    I'm thinking if some people plans to go to that lake, harvest the rocks in lake, grind to powder and sell for big $$$ per bottle, like Mosura's old sea mud or other brand's mineral powders for CRS.

  11. #10
    feiyang
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    Finally I can post links now.

    Here is my Sulawesi tank. But I will remove the driftwood and the coral substrate and rebuild.


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