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Thread: Fish that are safe with shrimps

  1. #11
    droid
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    Sorry, if I offended any shrimp fans, but I like to see some fish too.

    Go Pens! Fish on!
    andy

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    I keep oto's with my shrimp. They compete for food, but i put enough in for everyone. I also keep a couple scarlet badis in my other tank.

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    I keep Oto & boraras brigittae in my CRS tank. So far so good.

    However I don't keep them in my CRS breeding tank. Feel like they will harm the new born baby shrimps.

  4. #14
    droid
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    Below is an account of an extreme but successful experiment. It is not meant to offend, but only to illustrate the potential of shrimp and fish relationships. A variation of this experiment may be suitable for aquaculture.

    For six months, I have been keeping C. japonica (14) and a self-sustaining population of RCS and C. babaulti in the same tank with Discus and Crenicichla compressiceps. Both fish prey chiefly on crustaceans in the wild. C. compressiceps is a particularly efficient predator, but unlike other Crenicichla it's mouth is to small to accept an adult of the above species.

    Below are conditions which I believe have been essential to my success:

    1) A large tank. Mine is 300 liters.

    2) A heavily-planted tank with lush plant growth. This being accomplished by using T5 fluorescent bulbs and CO2 injection.

    3) Thickets of Anubias barteri, Rotala indica and Mayaca fluviatis which are impenetrable to C. compressiceps. A variety of other plants and mosses are present but I believe they are non-essential. In aquaculture a plastic grid may work.

    I believe the populations of RCS and C babaulti would collapse if adequate thickets were not provided and may collapse if C. compressiceps did not receive supplemental feedings.

    The populations are censused by turning on the lights in the middle of the night. All fourteen C. japonica were accounted for when the tank was remodeled and all plants and driftwood were removed excepting some cryptocorynes.

    I got this idea from doing habitat work on my farm in Western Pennsylvania. When I purchased the farm fifteen years ago, there were many predators living off an imbalanced population of mice and voles caused by years of intensive agriculture. However, there were almost no rabbits or game birds. After fifteen years of building brush piles and encouraging blackberry thickets, I still have as many predators but also many rabbits and game birds. So, with proper habitat there is ample food for the weasels, mink, opossums, skunks, raccoons, feral cats, bobcats, red foxes, grey foxes, coyotes, bears and puma (This last one only now making a comeback on the East coast) and ME.

    Editorial: Global habitat is critical. Shrimp and Tigers need good habitat as well as aquariums and zoos.

    Go Pens (Pens 2, Devils 0)! Fish On!
    andy

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    Contributor TitoC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by milt View Post
    Actually I do sometimes get irritated with my 2 otocinclus in my tank, they do compete with my CRS for food. I usually cut my algae wafers into many pieces to feed my CRS but the otocinclus will get to them and whats worse is that they like to thrash around to scare off the CRS from the food as if to state that "this is my territory so stay off it".I am especially worried for my shrimplets as they are so small and can easily be injured by all this thrashing around........I have not remove the otocinclus as invariably the CRS will get to the food eventually.... Does anyone else have the same problem?
    Yeah, I recognize this very well (Milt and I seem to agree a lot ). Otocincli are much bigger little buggers than usually described
    They are very smart and they even seem to play with eachother and other fish. In my community tank they play "jump the amano" around feeding time, as they know the shrimp instinctively jump away. But the berried females return to fight back
    And when it's quiet in the tank, they lounge together with their big nephew the siamese algae eater, hanging around on some anubias leaves like kids hanging on the block...
    At least they don't do stick-ups against the angel fish as the siamese guy does...

    However, parotocinclus behaved better in the shrimp tank. I just removed them in the end to have one food competitor less in there. I can vouch they did not catch any shrimplets (in a planted tank).

    In my next shrimp tanks I will also include some corydora midgets.

    @android: wow, that sounds like a nice food piramid. Crenicichla compressiceps is a real hunter..
    I also always dreamed of having a self-sustaining system in an aquarium/terrarium like a ant-farm connected to a terrarium with a Phrynosoma platyrhinos, or a single Esox lucius living as a king on top of a dozen of trophic levels with on the end basically light and fertilizer...
    hmmm, nature in a box...

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