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Thread: Safe way to remove snails without harming crystals reds

  1. #11
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    Iīm using stainless steel tweezer for a long time. Thatīs a good tool for all kind of works so I use it quite often. Also I use stainless steel mat for keeping moss at the ground since some weeks. I cannot see any problems so far.

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    I donít suggest the use of a stainless steel tweezer...plastic one are safer, thus preventing any metal to dissolve in the water...you can never know!!...

    Aaron
    Stainless steel is perfectly safe in water. It does not 'dissolve' when it contacts water.

  3. #13
    Aaron
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    I know how oxidation works (I’ve been working in a laboratory too), if stainless steel is subjected to long standing with water and air it will oxidize. Everyone knows how a tweezer is made up, I’m referring to the part which can trap a film of water between the "hinge" part of the tweezer. This part will remain in such conditions favourable to oxidation… in my opinion plastic tweezers are better.

    I never said it will kill your shrimp, but precaution is better then cure...

    Aaron

    edit: im not saying that soon after one use a twezzer, it will corrode...but that by time without the person knowing it can happen...

  4. #14
    Aaron
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    Some evidence on what I'm talking about...

    1. http://www.roboz.com/tweezers.asp

    "Stainless steel is less likely to show damage but it can still rust, corrode, pit, and be affected by chemicals and environmental conditions."

    2. http://www.azom.com/details.asp?articleID=1177

    Crevice Corrosion

    "...Areas where the oxide layer can break down can also sometimes be the result of the way components are designed,...in sharp re-entrant corners or associated with incomplete weld penetration or overlapping surfaces. These can all form crevices which can promote corrosion. To function as a corrosion site, a crevice has to be of sufficient width to permit entry of the corrodent, but sufficiently narrow to ensure that the corrodent remains stagnant. Accordingly crevice corrosion usually occurs in gaps a few micrometers wide, and is not found in grooves or slots in which circulation of the corrodent is possible. This problem can often be overcome by paying attention to the design of the component.."

    3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stainle...vice_corrosion

    Crevice corrosion

    "...or exposure to reducing atmosphere, the passivation layer protecting steel from corrosion can break down. This wear can also depend on the mechanical construction of the parts, eg. under gaskets, in sharp corners, or in incomplete welds. Such crevices may promote corrosion, if their size allows penetration of the corroding agent but not its free movement."

    Aaron

  5. #15
    Kenshin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron View Post
    I know how oxidation works (I’ve been working in a laboratory too), if stainless steel is subjected to long standing with water and air it will oxidize. Everyone knows how a tweezer is made up, I’m referring to the part which can trap a film of water between the "hinge" part of the tweezer. This part will remain in such conditions favourable to oxidation… in my opinion plastic tweezers are better.
    Aaron,

    Dude, I am glad that you have been working in a laboratory for a long time then to learn about oxidation process. But have you ever witnessed solutions evaporate very quickly in a dry environment if being exposed to air (which means if your bottles are not sealed tight in the first place). Even if the hinges part of the tweezer can trap a film of water, the water within it will still evaporate in a very short time unless you are soaking the tweezer in water forever. In addition, when one is using the pair of stainless tweezer for their aquarium, they are not soaking it in chemicals besides their own aquarium's water (in which it should have not acids). And I do not see any people who actually autoclave their stainless tweezers for just using it for their aquarium hobby usage, unless the tools are used for surgery or other sterilization process. Finally, in order for oxidation to occur, you stated that it has to be under reducing atmosphere. In a normal home, all home are under normal atmosphere pressure unless you are under the sea, or very high the sky, or if you are stuck in an autoclave. Increased pressured means reducing pressure! Also, the air inside your homes are supposed to be dry instead of high levels of moisture. If you have a lot of moisture in your house, you better start checking the structures of your house for damages because the foundation of the house will probably start to rot if it is made out of wood especially (or even stainless steel).

  6. #16
    aussieadam
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    Quote Originally Posted by echosaisis View Post
    How can I remove annoying snails without harming shrimp? I am afraid clown loaches will harm the shrimp. Stuff to put in the water might be bad for shrimp. My planted tank is crawling with ramshorns and other snails I dont want. Any advice or ideas?
    If you dont have many shrimp, why not catch them up (or as many as possible) Pop them in a breeding trap or seperate tank for a few days then introduce a clown loach or puffer for those few days? After its done the job, give it away to a friend or keep in a seperate tank untill next time! You probably wont get rid of all of them but it can slow the invasion!

  7. #17
    Aaron
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    Kenshin about the reducing atmosphere you are right...

    I know that the water between the tweezer hinge will mostly evaporate...but will all of it evaporate?...my house is made up of bricks so the problem of humidity is only present in winter.

    Apart from information I searched from the internet Iím basing my opinion on a personal tweezer which I donít use anymore and left it in the backyard on a shelf, at which its very end I can see a bit of rusting. the rusting is minute but it is still there...

    Photo: as one can see at the hinge joint there is rusting. and if one squeezes his eyes even more rusting can be observed further up, poping out where the two pieces of "stainless" steel are bounded together...

    Aaron
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #18
    echosaisis
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    I dont understand the relation to removing snails?

  9. #19
    Aaron
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    echosaisis your right we went off topic...

    but the relation is in fact what is it best to use in water > plastic or stainless steel twezzers ...

    Aaron

  10. #20
    Kenshin
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    Aaron,

    You just basically shot yourself in the foot there buddy. I own and live in a house made out of bricks as well. In the winter time, the air is supposed to have the least amount of humidity since it is dry even if it is snowing (unless you are in the southern sphere of the Earth where it is summer there or if you live near the equator where humidity is almost always high every season of the year).

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron View Post
    Apart from information I searched from the internet I’m basing my opinion on a personal tweezer which I don’t use anymore and left it in the backyard on a shelf, at which its very end I can see a bit of rusting. the rusting is minute but it is still there...
    You said it yourself already. If you leave any metal unattended (does not matter stainless or just plain iron, copper, aluminium, zinc, and etc.) out in your backyard where it is wide open to your atmosphere, you will get metal to rust no matter what. Think!!! When it rains, rain water's pH is usually slightly acidic (due to pollution and other factors) so therefore it will start to "eat" away your metal slowly by oxidizing it. Plus the sun also plays a role in oxidizing as well because the sun rays can slowly break the covalent bonds between the metal ions.

    Like I have stated in earlier posts, unless you leave your tweezer inside your aquarium, all of the water should evaporate inside the hinges no matter what as long as your tank and tweezers are inside the house.

    Back to the topic: You can use any types of tweezers. If you prefer plastic that is fine but stainless steel is more durable and you do not need to replace as often compare with plastic tweezers.

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