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Thread: Driftwood tannins

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    Default Driftwood tannins

    I purchased a small piece of driftwood (9" long x 7" wide x 5" tall) two months ago and I am still finding it difficult to remove all the tannins. I boiled the log for several hours on two seperate occasions, it is now waterlogged, and currently sitting in an unused bucket filled with water. I check on the log a few times a week, notice that it is still releasing heavy brown tannins, so I have been refilling with clean bucket water. What can I do to speed up this process or is it simply that I must play the waiting game? Please help! I know the tannins are not danagerous for my Cherries but I want to keep my tank looking clean.

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    Nothing.
    Only time can remove the tannins .
    By the way tannins are not harmful to your shrimp.
    We only remove them because WE like the look of crystal clear water.
    Your shrimp how ever could care less.
    In-fact some ( not all ) tannins can be beneficial to your shrimp.
    Some report that tannins actually help .
    I personally do not know. I due how ever use almond leaves in my shrimp tanks.
    they produce a small amounts of tannins .

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    I have some driftwoods that still release tanning after a whole year later. The only good thing as QC Discus said, it won't harm the fish, but it makes the tank in general looked awful.

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    Red face

    Sebastian

    All boiling does (other than kill a few nasties) if required is nothing but soften up the outer edges of the piece of DW.

    Take it out give it a good scrub with a new hard stiff brush to remove all the outer gunk and hose it off.

    Then into the tank.

    Some softer DWs will release tannins until they rot away, its not a problem and never will be in fact it can be good for many shrimps and fish.

    Keith

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    QC Discus is right on all account. Some people also use heavy tannin DW for lowering Ph values significantly, depending on the size of the DW versus tank size.

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    Don't boil it. The more you boil, the more it leech tannin.

    Just put into your tank and leave it there till it form bio film. The bio film will lesser the release of tannin. In the meantime, you can use activated carbon or Purigen to remove them from water column, I prefer Purigen over activated carbon.

    There is one method I never use before on driftwood but I usually use it on rocks (I usually soak my rocks in acid then alkaline to pre-age it) but in theory may work. Tannin, Humic acid and Fulvic are acidic, hence to neutralize and remove them will be using alkali solution. Maybe soak them in Potassium carbonate, calcium bicarbonate or caustic soda and water mixture will quickly remove them. If someone tried this before, please comment and let us know.

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    The problem with any of the soaking methods is that the chemical you soak them in ..
    soaks into the wood. Thus when you reintroduce that wood back into the tank it will release any
    chemical you have soaked it in....
    So for me that is a risky business as I do not know if "Potassium carbonate, calcium bicarbonate or caustic soda "
    in any concentration is hazardous to shrimp.
    I do agree that if the tannins are unsightly , then a filter running carbon WILL remove the discoloration .Simple and safe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by QC Discus View Post
    The problem with any of the soaking methods is that the chemical you soak them in ..
    soaks into the wood. Thus when you reintroduce that wood back into the tank it will release any
    chemical you have soaked it in....
    So for me that is a risky business as I do not know if "Potassium carbonate, calcium bicarbonate or caustic soda "
    in any concentration is hazardous to shrimp.
    I do agree that if the tannins are unsightly , then a filter running carbon WILL remove the discoloration .Simple and safe.
    I totally agree with you that's why I only soak my rock. The reason of why I soak my rock is because I had very bad experience of rock leaches too much mineral, especially carbonates and iron, when it is first introduced in the tank (may leech for months). That's why I pre-age it with acid (usually diluted white vinegar) and neutralize it with potassium carbonate then later wash it clean. After that, the substrate will neutralize the leftover potassium carbonate. potassium carbonate is harmless to shrimp; I believe planted tank folks may have used Bright K before, which is potassium carbonate.

    Do take note on one thing about Activated Carbon. It does absorb important meso mineral such as calcium and magnesium but in very small quantity. However when it is used in conjunction with UV light for extended period, you will face with meso mineral deficiency. Therefore, do not use them together. I learned this through bad experience and conduct some test on it before.

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    I personally test new rocks by dripping some muriatic acid on them .
    If they react ( bubble ) then I know I can not use them in a R/O ( soft water ) tank .
    I due how ever use them in a straight tap water setup as my tap water is already very hard ( PH 8.5 TDS 400-1200 depending on the well being used ) and thus the rocks wont demineralize .
    Long term demineralizing from carbon should not be an issue as long as you stay up on water changes . As you will continually adding minerals back into the tank with each water change. I do not beleave that carbon removes minerals faster then what is replaced by water changes . But I am correctable on that .

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    Thanks everyone.

    So do we agree that brushing off the film/junk (per Keith's response) will help or does this layer prevent additional tannins being released. I like the premise of the idea.

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