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Thread: What to do with my CPOs?

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    Exclamation What to do with my CPOs?

    I have a 20g long shrimp tank with several species of shrimp, (Blue Velvet, Green Babaulti, C. propinqua, C. fernandoi, Green Lace Shrimp, Amanos, etc.). My tank is a shrimp paradise. About 20% of the left side of the tank is just a wall of mixed moss, I call it the moss jungle. That's where the shrimp spend most of their time, and it's actually hard to see them. There's also a smaller "Subwassertang jungle," and a plethora of other mosses and java fern varieties, Malaysian driftwood and cholla wood. In one order I placed for shrimp and Nerites, I received a bonus CPO, so I now keep CPOs in my shrimp tank. I have two berried CPOs, but I also have three berried Blue Velvets, and I believe I spotted a berried Green Babaulti in the moss jungle.

    So my problem is, the CPOs will eat the juvie shrimps correct? As well as their own young. Everyone I've talked to has said I should move the CPOs to their own tank. My question is, can I raise the baby CPOs with the baby shrimp, or should I set up a separate tank for the baby CPOs? I've heard of people keeping baby CPOs in breeding nets until they reach a certain size. How large of a tank do I need to raise all these CPOs? I intend to sell almost all of them if I can successfully raise them. So I'm kinda at a loss, what do you think I should do with all these berried CPOs and shrimp?!!!??!

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    Crays in general are not good to have with shrimp. They are intensely cannibalistic if you do not provide enough hiding places for each one. FOr the most part they are very territorial.

    They will also do quite a number on aquatic plants, as they are omnivorous. Baby CPOs will become cannibalistic during a molt (as whoever is incapacitated with the molting process is an easy meal for another member.

    On the other hand, Marbled Self Cloning crays are generally peaceful and are a bit more tolerable of each other. I still wouldn't have a cray in any of my shrimp tanks even if they had a decent track record if that means anything. I have seen videos of people feeding scorpions to them and munching happily away.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Asphalt art View Post
    Crays in general are not good to have with shrimp. They are intensely cannibalistic if you do not provide enough hiding places for each one. FOr the most part they are very territorial.
    Ummmm... you did not answer my question. I know that it is not ideal to keep CPOs with shrimp, that is why I made this thread, because I want to move them out of my shrimp tank. Maybe I should've been more clear. Logistically speaking, at this point, what would be the best way to proceed with my CPOs? I've got two berried plus another one, and right now my plan is to move the three of them to a 10g long. My main question is what to do with the juvies, can I keep them all in a breeder box or net? Would a 10g be big enough for that? I've also got a 40g breeder I could use if necessary. C'mon, there's gotta be someone here who breeds these guys! Can you please describe your set-up and how you raise them please?

    Quote Originally Posted by Asphalt art View Post
    They will also do quite a number on aquatic plants, as they are omnivorous. Baby CPOs will become cannibalistic during a molt (as whoever is incapacitated with the molting process is an easy meal for another member.

    On the other hand, Marbled Self Cloning crays are generally peaceful and are a bit more tolerable of each other. I still wouldn't have a cray in any of my shrimp tanks even if they had a decent track record if that means anything. I have seen videos of people feeding scorpions to them and munching happily away.
    Do you keep or breed CPOs? I mean no offense, but my question is specifically about CPOs and breeding them, not the behavior of crayfish in general. If you have a decent tank set-up and take care of them properly (i.e. make sure they're fed), they won't "do quite a number" on the plants. I've never seen one of my CPOs even try to eat a plant. And how are marmokrebs relevant to my problem? I can't wave a wand and magically transform my berried CPOs into marmokrebs even if I wanted to. Plus CPOs are generally peaceful anyway given the proper conditions. Their aggressiveness is really over-exaggerated in my opinion. I would argue that it is actually easier to keep CPOs than marmokrebs without them fighting or eating plants. And I have never even kept marmokrebs, so I am really stepping out on a limb here since I am not speaking from personal experience.

    Also where is the video of a CPO eating a scorpion? That sounds dope! I searched for it via google and youtube, but couldn't find it

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    I actually did answer by stating they can get very territorial. That premise alone would place the need of either a high volume tank for a few adults, as anything slower than them can likely become a snack. Shrimp are generally fast and can avoid them, but large amounts of hiding places (like your little java jungle) give too much opportunity for ambush (which is the primary concern).

    Could you use a breeder net? Of course you can, but only for a limited amount of time. LIke I said, high concentrations and the first molt get interesting. Feed them so much that they avoid this behavior and you will be doing more water changes than are practically feasible to a hobbyist. They will each attempt to find a hiding spot and claim it. The reason I mentioned Clonies is because if you are interested in making money by breeding them, you should venture into these first. They are more passive than Clarkii, and have a higher tolerance for higher stocking densities. For what it is worth, stick your finger in one of their holes with them in it and tell me how passive they are

    If it is relevant information, I used to keep a large amount of Crays from 2006-2008 and was breeding them until I was married. We are talking close to 30 10g tanks modified with dividers to house them all. The apartment complex I lived in had a hernia every time they came to do maintenance on the place (which I understand). I kept around 7 different kinds at all times based on what was selling. They easily paid the rent by themselves.

    Each species had their own 40 breeder with 1 male and 3 females each. Berried females were transferred to 20g breeders (based by color) until they dropped their young and were placed back into the communal breeding tank. I usually waited about 2 weeks and would hand pick the largest/most colorful specimens into the divided 10g, 2 each side (male/female pairs) until I ran out of space. Many, many culled young were given to a friend with some very hungry cichlids. Sometimes the pairs got along, and about 15% of the time I would find one in pieces. They all liked to uproot plants in the beginning, and the breeder tanks were fully coated in duckweed which also helped keep them shaded (nocturnal critters of course) and helped me by being incredible water filters (they suck ammonia like it is going out of style). The 3 marmos I kept were in a single 55g and I never bothered to transfer young because they reproduce so ridiculously fast and i witnessed them walking all over each other without issues. Water changes were every week with tap for that tank. If they required RO/DI because of crappy water I would have stopped breeding them altogether honestly.

    Honestly they are space hogs when it comes to space. If you have no issues using a spare 40g that you have absolutely no use for, go for it. It is going to be a while until I decide to get back into them, based on the dedication required to keep them as breeders. God forbid you ever see what happens with 3 berried females worth of young at the same time. That ends up being a very interesting juvie tank.

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    Now that's what I'm talking about! That's the kinda info I was looking for

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    Also that's sick that you paid your rent with crays

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    I sold pairs mostly around 40-50 a sexed pair and I made a little with shipping. Some people just wanted singles and they got whatever was left in my birthing tank as a choice. Rent wasn't much at the time, and you have to remember I had no less than 19-21 females constantly pushing little ones. It was honestly work, on top of me working all day. I did not have much free time when WC depends on extra money (I have a VW addiction to feed). That is why I say that I would have stopped if they needed RO/DI (if my tap turned to junk) I would have not been able to afford enough RO/DI system to keep up with that much water. I just used a garden hose adapter on the sink after siphoning the old out the back porch into the drainage ditch (yes I had a sponge filter on the uptake tube). Don't let these little things into the wilderness, ESP a Marmokreb.

    Generalized math:

    20 mated females x 10 offspring (I culled a lot, kept certain ones for rebreeding, etc) = 200 offspring a month roughly

    200 x 10 bucks each (low number, I usually sold them for twice that) = 2 grand. Bad month? I still have 1 grand in my pocket.

    They usually gave me on average around 20 juveniles each.

    Water was free at the apartment as you could imagine. When I gave it up I gave all the stock to a business acquaintance and packed my tanks away roughly 5 years ago. I just now pulled them back out a month of so ago, and although my wife broke/cracked a lot in the move (she didn't know better, packed them full of stuff like a cardboard box) I ended up with about 10 tanks that were still usable. I am restarting this time with shrimp, and I have a lot more free time (and space).

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