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milalic
30th Mar 2006, 03:20 AM
I want to lower the ph in my shrimp tank. My tap water pg is a little high at the moment. Would you guys suggest the use of CO2? Any other suggestions?

Thanks
Pedro

retardo
30th Mar 2006, 04:50 AM
Peat and/or crush coral can be used to lower pH.

Herbie
30th Mar 2006, 04:51 AM
Here is a pretty good discussion on this:

hmmm...I tried to post a link, but I guess only regular members can. I am irregular :)

Anyhow, check in the water management part of the forum. There is a post about lowering PH 'Using CO2 to lower PH' right near the top.

Herbie
30th Mar 2006, 04:57 AM
Peat and/or crush coral can be used to lower pH.

Would crushed coral not raise the pH?

YuccaPatrol
30th Mar 2006, 05:31 AM
Peat to lower pH, Coral to raise it

retardo
30th Mar 2006, 06:08 AM
lol Yes, crushed coral raises pH. I was just thinking of what things added change pH. I am correcting myself. :embarasse

Jenova
30th Mar 2006, 07:50 AM
I want to lower the ph in my shrimp tank. My tap water pg is a little high at the moment. Would you guys suggest the use of CO2? Any other suggestions?

Thanks
Pedro

Hi Pedro,

I used ADA (Aqua Design Amano) Amazonia soil, they are good because the PH will remain constantly low around 6.60. I tried peat moss before, but I still prefer ADA soil.

Regards,

John Lim

Nickel
30th Mar 2006, 09:04 AM
I recently changed to ADA Soil in my 3ft tank.

Water PH still at 7.4, same as my tap water. Nothing else except a DW and moss in tank with shrimps.

Does it takes time for the ADA Soil to reduce PH ?

Jenova
30th Mar 2006, 11:57 AM
I recently changed to ADA Soil in my 3ft tank.

Water PH still at 7.4, same as my tap water. Nothing else except a DW and moss in tank with shrimps.

Does it takes time for the ADA Soil to reduce PH ?

Mine was instance. Sometimes is the KH (hardness) of the water. You might need to soften the water for it to take effect.

Regards,

John

Nickel
30th Mar 2006, 03:00 PM
Thanks John. I expect instant too, but it did not happen.

Next question is how to soften (lower KH) water without making water brownish as in peat moss ?

YuccaPatrol
30th Mar 2006, 08:03 PM
To lower KH without peat, you can use RO water but you will either need to buy an RO system or find somewhere you can buy it. Long term it would be better to buy the water treatment system.

Remember that RO water has zero hardness so you will want to mix it with your regular water to get the hardness right.

One thing I would like to say about "hardness" is that it would really be better and easier to understand "hardness" if we didn't use the same word for GH and KH.

KH is better described as "alkalinity" or "buffering capacity". It is the ability to absorb and neutralize acid without changing the pH.

Then we can use the term "hardness" for GH and understand it as the concentration of calcium and magnesium ions in our water. When we want to create soft water, we are trying to lower the GH.

Jenova
30th Mar 2006, 08:16 PM
Thanks John. I expect instant too, but it did not happen.

Next question is how to soften (lower KH) water without making water brownish as in peat moss ?

Was recommended by a shop to use Azoo Water Softener (S$8) with peat moss.

Since I had changed to use ADA soil and lower my PH to 6.6x, I have left it in the drawer. I have yet to try, so I can't comment. :embarasse

Regards,

John

Robert
30th Mar 2006, 08:48 PM
Hi John,
what are you water parameters? Newbies often seem to think that they get more and healthier shrimps if they modify their water. They add this and that and create a nice cocktail of what ever chemicals. Hey, there is no need for it! What shrimps really need is clean water which means no copper, no chlorine, no chloramine or other toxic stuff. A good biological filtration in a well planted tank, which provides enough places to hide and enough food, is all they need. You can breed even CRS for years under non-optimal conditions. For a shrimp it doesn't matter if the pH is 6.7 or 6.8 as long as the "environment" is OK.

In nature some species like diamond and tiger shrimps and some other species live in small shallow brooks. This means that even a heavy down pour could change the water parameters to a certain degree. But these shrimps survive. What matters is how the brook looks like. How strong is the current, how much oxygen is dissolved in the water, are there places to hide like litter, roots, stones etc. and is their enough food. In a longkang with perfect water conditions but without something to makan they would hardly survive.

regards
Robert

Herbie
30th Mar 2006, 09:28 PM
The ADA soil lowers the pH of the water? Interesting. How long is it able to do that for....does it lose its ability to do this after awhile?

Jenova
31st Mar 2006, 06:06 AM
Hi John,
what are you water parameters? Newbies often seem to think that they get more and healthier shrimps if they modify their water. They add this and that and create a nice cocktail of what ever chemicals. Hey, there is no need for it! What shrimps really need is clean water which means no copper, no chlorine, no chloramine or other toxic stuff. A good biological filtration in a well planted tank, which provides enough places to hide and enough food, is all they need. You can breed even CRS for years under non-optimal conditions. For a shrimp it doesn't matter if the pH is 6.7 or 6.8 as long as the "environment" is OK.

In nature some species like diamond and tiger shrimps and some other species live in small shallow brooks. This means that even a heavy down pour could change the water parameters to a certain degree. But these shrimps survive. What matters is how the brook looks like. How strong is the current, how much oxygen is dissolved in the water, are there places to hide like litter, roots, stones etc. and is their enough food. In a longkang with perfect water conditions but without something to makan they would hardly survive.

regards
Robert

Thanks for the advice. Currently, I'm only measuring the PH (which is at 6.6x), as for the rest of the parameters I don't really care.

Are you sure you are from Germany? :huh:

Regards,
John

Jenova
31st Mar 2006, 06:15 AM
The ADA soil lowers the pH of the water? Interesting. How long is it able to do that for....does it lose its ability to do this after awhile?

My water PH at home (Singapore/Tampines) is around 7.50-7.80, and once I added the ADA the PH dropped to 6.6x. How I know? Because I did a revamp lately. :cry:

How long does it last? That I can't answer. But I read somewhere that when you add ADA soil, sometimes it will give you ammonia/nitrate spike. I'm not sure, because I don't have any equipments/tools to measure that. :undecided

Regards,
John

Herbie
31st Mar 2006, 06:20 AM
Thanks for the info, Jenova. Sounds like the pH of my water in Canada is very similar to yours. Is your water quite hard as well? I ask as some say you have to soften water a bit for the soil to work.

This stuff might be something I would look into (I use Eco-Complete now) if it could do that long term. I would like to know how it lowers the pH, that might give me an idea as to how long it can do it for!

Nickel
31st Mar 2006, 07:00 AM
My water PH at home (Singapore/Tampines) is around 7.50-7.80, and once I added the ADA the PH dropped to 6.6x. How I know? Because I did a revamp lately. :cry:

How long does it last? That I can't answer. But I read somewhere that when you add ADA soil, sometimes it will give you ammonia/nitrate spike. I'm not sure, because I don't have any equipments/tools to measure that. :undecided

Regards,
John


Funny thing is my home's PH is around 7.4 (as measured by me calibrated PH pen consistently) but my PH in tank is higher than that. Should be contributed by the KH's effect.

Just curious is if hardness of water supplied by PUB (Singapore utlilty here) is different to different part of the country ?

Robert's point about a cocktail is what's holding me back from adding anything non natural.

silane
31st Mar 2006, 08:35 AM
Nickel,

Are you still having problem with PH after adding adasoil? If so, just wait, the added Adasoil will gradually lower the PH even though your water is in weak alkaline range.

Jenova
31st Mar 2006, 09:17 AM
Funny thing is my home's PH is around 7.4 (as measured by me calibrated PH pen consistently) but my PH in tank is higher than that. Should be contributed by the KH's effect.

Just curious is if hardness of water supplied by PUB (Singapore utlilty here) is different to different part of the country ?

Robert's point about a cocktail is what's holding me back from adding anything non natural.

I totally agree with Robert, I don't like adding too much chemicals into the tank. I tried as much as possible to use natural stuffs in my tank.

Yes, the water quality varies from different part of Singapore (even it's a small island). Some of my friends in Yishun and Bishan are getting PH as high as 8.x!

Tank PH is usually slightly higher because of waste (ammonia/nitrate) in the water. This waste is usually breakdown by the good bacteria in your tank. So if you clean your filteration system thoroughly, all your good bacteria will be gone. That's when you will have ammonia/nitrate spikes. It takes time to build up the good bacteria (aka BB).

Regards,
John

Robert
31st Mar 2006, 09:20 AM
Are you sure you are from Germany? :huh:

Regards,
John

Hi John,
you pH seems to be OK. If you still have any problems, ask your other Singaporean members to help you e.g. with a test of some of your water parameters. Fruitpie organised last year meetings for Singaporean members of this forum. It could be helpful for you and others to meet and exchange experiences. All of you live on a rather small island and most of you get the same tap water, imported from Malaysia. So you should have more or less the same problems with it.

John, I'm quite sure that I'm a German. I was born and raised in the former German Democratic Republic and still live in the Federal Republic of Germany. My ancestors (at least the last 6 generations) were also Germans. So I have no doubts that I'm a German.

But I know a few Singaporeans and over the years I learned to understand your Singlish to a certain degree. Normally I avoid using it and use proper English instead. But sometimes it could be helpful :) .

regards
Robert

Nickel
31st Mar 2006, 09:41 AM
Nickel,

Are you still having problem with PH after adding adasoil? If so, just wait, the added Adasoil will gradually lower the PH even though your water is in weak alkaline range.


Ya. I may be due to the more frequent change in water as it was slightly cloudy with the ADA soil.

Will leave it alone to settle down and bring down the PH.

Jenova
31st Mar 2006, 10:38 AM
Hi John,
you pH seems to be OK. If you still have any problems, ask your other Singaporean members to help you e.g. with a test of some of your water parameters. Fruitpie organised last year meetings for Singaporean members of this forum. It could be helpful for you and others to meet and exchange experiences. All of you live on a rather small island and most of you get the same tap water, imported from Malaysia. So you should have more or less the same problems with it.

John, I'm quite sure that I'm a German. I was born and raised in the former German Democratic Republic and still live in the Federal Republic of Germany. My ancestors (at least the last 6 generations) were also Germans. So I have no doubts that I'm a German.

But I know a few Singaporeans and over the years I learned to understand your Singlish to a certain degree. Normally I avoid using it and use proper English instead. But sometimes it could be helpful :) .

regards
Robert

That explained the "longkang" and "makan" phrase. :joking:
Some of our water are recycled using what's called the "New Water".
I think that greatly increase the PH level.

Regards,
John

silane
31st Mar 2006, 02:45 PM
In a longkang with perfect water conditions but without something to makan they would hardly survive.


Robert, you should not use Singlish at all as you alway frawn upon when members use in the forum. So set a good example.

silane
31st Mar 2006, 02:47 PM
That explained the "longkang" and "makan" phrase. :joking:
Some of our water are recycled using what's called the "New Water".
I think that greatly increase the PH level.

Regards,
John

In fact, I noticed a drop of PH when Newater was introduced. It was near 8 before, now is near 7.

A hobbyist claims that he has 6.5 whom live in Bishan, I wonder if his water pipe get corruded.

Jenova
31st Mar 2006, 03:10 PM
In fact, I noticed a drop of PH when Newater was introduced. It was near 8 before, now is near 7.

A hobbyist claims that he has 6.5 whom live in Bishan, I wonder if his water pipe get corruded.

Sometimes it makes me wonder if it the user or the PH Pen. I always soak my pen in the water for 5 mins. What is the normal practice?

Regards,
John

milalic
13th Apr 2006, 02:17 AM
Hi John,
you pH seems to be OK. If you still have any problems, ask your other Singaporean members to help you e.g. with a test of some of your water parameters. Fruitpie organised last year meetings for Singaporean members of this forum. It could be helpful for you and others to meet and exchange experiences. All of you live on a rather small island and most of you get the same tap water, imported from Malaysia. So you should have more or less the same problems with it.

John, I'm quite sure that I'm a German. I was born and raised in the former German Democratic Republic and still live in the Federal Republic of Germany. My ancestors (at least the last 6 generations) were also Germans. So I have no doubts that I'm a German.

But I know a few Singaporeans and over the years I learned to understand your Singlish to a certain degree. Normally I avoid using it and use proper English instead. But sometimes it could be helpful :) .

regards
Robert


Would you say water been soft is more important than acidic water for breeding CRS, bumble bee?

alfredo
26th Sep 2006, 08:00 AM
The ADA soil lowers the pH of the water? Interesting. How long is it able to do that for....does it lose its ability to do this after awhile?

I know this thread has been here for awhile, but, I don't see any reply... :huh:

I'm just as curious to know as Herbie about how long can ADA soil last before losing its ability to lower the PH? 01 year?

I'm currently having a planted tank & my shrimp are fine... doesn't have any "test kit" as I don't see a need.... :embarasse

Will I have a problem after 01 year?? :cry:

Please advise... Thanks

Regards,

Alfredo