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View Full Version : Got my Red cherries on thursday.



will5
5th Mar 2006, 10:01 PM
Hi well as the title says. I got my very first Red Cherries in the mail on Thursday and I love these guys. In fact I love them so much I am going to buy 10 more. I have seven right now. I have plenty of algae in the tank right now and I am feeding them HIKARI ALGAE WAFERS. Which happens to be loaded with calcium. I really CAN'T WAIT UNTIL they are old enough to start breeding. The person I bought them from said it would be another 4-6 weeks before they will be old enough to breed. They seem to be getting along with my 3 SEA'S and 6 Neon tetra's. Is there any tips tricks I am missing?

I have an AQUA CLEAR sponge over the intake of my hang on back filter. I just starting injecting Diy Co2 the right way to day (into the intake of my filter). I had the ladder before did not do a thing and the tank is a ten gallon.

I am worried, however. In the summer I have to turn off the heater on my 29 gallon. Because the tanks get in the low to mid 90's without a heater. I don't know how hot this tank will get with it being so small.

I posted in the Snails section can someone please remove it from there. Sorry.

Beviking
7th Mar 2006, 03:04 AM
Congrats on the shrimp. If your tank gets into the mid-90's you will start seeing some white (meaning dead) cherry shrimp :shocked:
You might want to investigate ways to keep it cooled down...like bags of ice cubes?

-Be

retardo
7th Mar 2006, 05:20 AM
Never do ice cubes!! :shocked: It causes a rapid decline in temperature and will easily stress out any animals. Imagine yourself in a bathtub that is warm and then dunked full of ice. Not a desireable place to be!

Beviking
7th Mar 2006, 08:40 PM
lol You have to use some common sense. I apologize for not spelling that out! DO NOT FILL YOUR TANK WITH ICE! Surely one ice cube in 10 gallons of water will not do much to change the temperature. I do not recommend adding the ice cubes directly to the water either. Place them in a bag and let it float in the tank ;)

will5
7th Mar 2006, 09:21 PM
Well, I was advised not to float an ice bag by my LFS and some members on another forum. This is not just a shrimp tank. It also contains 3 SEA'S and 6 Neon Tetras. This would really stress out my fish. I have to figure out some way.

The hood on this tank is weird. The hood hold the light and it not the other ones where you put the hood down the set the strip with the light on top of the glass. Its all one piece. There is a piece of metal back behind the screw in PC bulbs. The metal pieces held in place by one screw in each and the metal pieces are covering vent holes. I could take them off and that would allow more heat to escape through the top. Of course I would loose some light to my plants but reflectors are crap and it would probably be a very small amount of light. :undecided

retardo
8th Mar 2006, 02:52 AM
lol You have to use some common sense. I apologize for not spelling that out! DO NOT FILL YOUR TANK WITH ICE! Surely one ice cube in 10 gallons of water will not do much to change the temperature. I do not recommend adding the ice cubes directly to the water either. Place them in a bag and let it float in the tank ;)

Discretion is definitely recommended. However, IMO, I don't think ice should ever be used as an option, even if just one cube. The cold temp is isolated right around the ice cube itself and when it melts, it will still take time for the dilution and temp to normalize... and that can cause problems! :x

Beviking
8th Mar 2006, 03:32 AM
Discretion is definitely recommended. However, IMO, I don't think ice should ever be used as an option, even if just one cube. The cold temp is isolated right around the ice cube itself and when it melts, it will still take time for the dilution and temp to normalize... and that can cause problems! :x

Actually, it's better if the temp takes time to normalize. Wouldn't want to shock them with an instant temp change would we?
If the ice is in a bag, it cannot mix into the tank water. We're dealing with conduction, not convection. The same way your tank loses or gains heat from the surrounding air.
It certainly may not be the best possible option, but an option none the less.

-Be

retardo
8th Mar 2006, 05:42 AM
Good point. An option is an option. Res ipsa loquitur... use at your own risk.

Just to clarify, what I meant by time for the temp to "normalize" was that there would still be a concentration of cold water around the ice cube/block/bag. You're right in that it is conduction rather than convection, but only partially. It's probably a combination of both since the conduction of the colder water would have to convect around the rest of the tank before normalized temp occurs.

I think one way around this is to put the ice into a sump or somehow inject the setup with the colder water over a period of time. But then again, I suppose the fish/shrimp would stay away instinctively from the less desireable temperature area.


-r

cheesenips
8th Mar 2006, 10:38 AM
It would be helpful if our friends from asian countries could give some imput on this topic since it gets pretty warm from them year round with the tropical claimate.

From previous post, I have seen idea of using chillers (simaliar to certain saltwater reef setups) or something as simple as a fan. What type of lighting are you using? Perhaps you can elevate the lights to get rid of some heat, have a fan running directed at the surface of the water, make sure theres some circulation in your water with your filters (remember warmer water contains less oxygen, same applies for waters that are still, thats why we have pumps)

But ice should be avoided since it is too exteme and would cause too much of an impact to the conditions of the water. Think in terms of stability. Ice would decrease the temp of the water but besides it being too quick, you would have to continously do this since the water would warm up after the ice have dissolved.

Goodluck

Beviking
8th Mar 2006, 08:54 PM
... besides it being too quick, you would have to continously do this since the water would warm up after the ice have dissolved.

Goodluck

That is the biggest problem I see and as retardo said, it's an option, not necessarily the best.

It would be advantageous for those from asian countries (and others with the same situation) to post. I suspect they are all too busy laughing at a couple guys from the U.S.A. bickering over an ice cube lol ;) :joking:

-Be

will5
8th Mar 2006, 10:14 PM
It would be advantageous for those from asian countries (and others with the same situation) to post

Yes it would help very much. :wink: Thanks for all the help guys/girls.

William

retardo
8th Mar 2006, 11:26 PM
That is the biggest problem I see and as retardo said, it's an option, not necessarily the best. :huh: :embarasse >( Your words first! I only agreed with you that it's an option... perhaps for others, but not for myself. Since I live in San Francisco, where the weather is mild and there's no need for ice cubes, I don't have to contend with this issue as much. :cool:


I suspect they are all too busy laughing at a couple guys from the U.S.A. bickering over an ice cube lol ;) :joking:

-Be They may be laughing, but I'm sure they come across this issue all the time and have to deal with how to keep their tanks cool. I think most use fans of some sort to take a few degrees off the temp. Those that can afford chillers use chillers.

lol I don't think we're bickering... it's open dialog, and if it saves a few animals in the process, all the better. :cool:

Beviking
17th Mar 2006, 03:58 AM
lol I don't think we're bickering... it's open dialog, and if it saves a few animals in the process, all the better. :cool:

No, I don't think we're bickering either...the thought struck me as humorous. :)
We're all here to save the animals and hopefully save each other some hassle.

-Be

retardo
17th Mar 2006, 04:32 AM
We're all here to save the animals and hopefully save each other some hassle.

-Be

Cheers to that!