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nano
8th Feb 2006, 09:29 AM
Hi all,

My first try-n-err0r experimenting on breeding yamato. Anyone had any experience breeding yamato? Just wondering any good way to do water change on the breeding tank without sucking out the larvaes? I see fungus and mould of uneaten food at the bottom of the tank that's worrying me.

Thanks in advance.

AaronT
13th Feb 2006, 03:26 AM
Yes, I have successfully bred yamato shrimp. I used the instructions on a website someone told me about where you use phytoplankton.

No feeding is necessary. I found the phytoplankton culture necessary to do it on aquabid for $10.00. I was able to grow out 7 to full adulthood. :) Next time I think I can get a better yield.

retardo
13th Feb 2006, 06:12 AM
Aaron,

You would be doing this forum a great service if you could provide more details on exactly what you did to successfully breed the yamato's. This topic has been brought up before, but no one has had any real success. I've read articles about the successful breeding also, but have not had any success replicating the steps.

Thanks.

baruch mor
13th Feb 2006, 06:19 PM
Aaron, growing only 7 is not considered a full success imo.
In my planted tank i can find (RARELY) caridina japonica babies with out doing anything special although the water is freshwater and lots of tetras.
Don't know if its a coincidence but the always "hang" on the nuphar japonica.

retardo
14th Feb 2006, 05:05 AM
BM,

Sounds like you have had success breeding yamatos. Aaron's 7 is better than none, which is what most of us end up with for those who have tried. Care to share you methods, care, and/or water parameters? I've heard of FW successes elsewhere as well, due to the KH/GH readings being close to those of a brackish environment, which is what is needed for yamato larvae to thrive.

Thanks!

AaronT
14th Feb 2006, 07:42 AM
Sure I'll go into detail. I was pressed for time during my first post:

I had two 2 gallon glass containers. Each one was running a limestone airstone. One had freshwater in it with some moss. That container was were I transferred a pregnant female that was about to hatch. The other container had a FULL salt water solution with a phytoplankton culture that had been going for a couple weeks with a 13 watt screw in FL light on it 24-7. When I saw the female had hatched I used a Seachem FLourish dropper to gently suck up hundreds of zoes and transfer them to the phytoplankton culture. I left them in there with the light and airstone ALWAYS running. For whatever reason it is extremely important to keep the light on all the time. After about 5 weeks you'll see the little orange zoes start to morph and grab the sides of the container. Then you can transfer them to another container with full salt water. Change out 1/2 of the water every day and replace it with freshwater for 4 days and put them in freshwater on the 5th day.

I know where I lost almost all of the zoes. My phytoplankton culture got too weak. I think with 1 50% water change I could have gotten a few dozen shrimp easily. The best part about this method is that you just sit back and watch. No feeding is necessary aside from the culture they are in. Therefore the water takes much longer to foul.

retardo
14th Feb 2006, 08:03 AM
Aaron,

Did you take the zoes straight out of the FW solution and dump them directly into the SW? No acclimation whatsoever? Reportedly, the zoes cannot survive in SW right after the hatch and require a brackish environment to thrive. What are your thoughts?

Thx.

nano
14th Feb 2006, 11:24 AM
Aaron, great info but a bit too late, but will try again.

Did you mentioned you transfer the zoes into SW after the morph (5weeks)? I thought they already in the SW with the culture in it?

I also read that light must be on 24/7 but dont understand why? Even in nature there's no 24/7.

baruch mor
14th Feb 2006, 01:47 PM
In my planted tank KH/GH are around 5-6, far from breckish water...
still i could see shrimplets hidind here n there from time to time. And yes, they are growing

DADude
14th Feb 2006, 01:49 PM
Hey, check this out: mikes-machine.mine.nu/breeding_yamato.htm

nano
14th Feb 2006, 05:24 PM
BM, you sure those are yamatos? if you're not sure, i can point you to some links. :)

AaronT
15th Feb 2006, 01:03 AM
Aaron, great info but a bit too late, but will try again.

Did you mentioned you transfer the zoes into SW after the morph (5weeks)? I thought they already in the SW with the culture in it?

I also read that light must be on 24/7 but dont understand why? Even in nature there's no 24/7.

Actually in nature, they are attracted to the surface of the water where there is moonlight.

I transfer the zoes directly from the FW tank to the SW tank, no acclimation process whatsoever. Transferring the fully morphed babies back into FW should be done more slowly as I described.

This is the website that I followed: caridina.japonica.online.fr/English/Elevage.htm

baruch mor
16th Feb 2006, 02:36 PM
BM, you sure those are yamatos? if you're not sure, i can point you to some links. :)
Yes nano i'm sure. they are the only shrimps that i could find in israel until a year ago.

eyal
17th Feb 2006, 05:01 AM
Yamato shrimp needs bracish water and salinity between 35-40 ppt to evolve between planktonic stages :thumbsup:

silane
18th Feb 2006, 06:17 PM
I have tried to breed, but no luck at 28C. Someone else has quite a sizable offsprings at 26C and hard water, he didn't do anything to transfer the zoes to saline water, just a planted tank.

eyal
20th Feb 2006, 05:25 PM
I find it hard to believe they were real amano !!