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amanda
8th Dec 2010, 05:31 PM
Can any body recommend any good ro systems i have had a look at a few and am now totally confused as to which are the best:huh:
any help will be gratefully recieved:)

imke_j
8th Dec 2010, 07:54 PM
Hi Amanda, if you buy an de-ionizer, you will not waste water; the output of RO-systems is mostly 1:2. Some shops not only offer the de-ionizer, but also the regeneration for the cartridges. That's good if you fear to handle the acids and bases. Would be my first choice for a water preparation system.

TripleLexx
8th Dec 2010, 09:40 PM
I got one online for like 100 with a 3.2 gallon tank and tap.
Not too bothered about the runoff, has been working great for months now.
It's got 2 canisters, think it's 3-5 stage, and it does about 50 or 100g a day.
Doing the job for me, can't say I considered a de-ionizer.

amanda
9th Dec 2010, 12:13 AM
do deionsers work the same as ro systems ? by removing 99% of every thing, i have had a look at a discus fish site that sells ro with inbuilt di units that they say adds final polish to water plus all cartridge refills of the resins. which looks good on another site they sell just the di cartridge that states you will get 0 tds with refills available also.
Read some facts etc about ro and di but my head exploded with all the technical talk.
Imj-e is it all about the tds?if its 0 does that mean pure water with absolutely no contaminents?
sorry if i sound a bit daft:embarasse

TripleLexx
9th Dec 2010, 12:58 AM
do deionsers work the same as ro systems ? by removing 99% of every thing, i have had a look at a discus fish site that sells ro with inbuilt di units that they say adds final polish to water plus all cartridge refills of the resins. which looks good on another site they sell just the di cartridge that states you will get 0 tds with refills available also.
Read some facts etc about ro and di but my head exploded with all the technical talk.
Imj-e is it all about the tds?if its 0 does that mean pure water with absolutely no contaminents?
sorry if i sound a bit daft:embarasse

You'll get pretty close with just an RO membrane, but carbon will help as well.
I'd just mostly recommend the need for a tank cause it takes ages to process.

Mine has a small carbon pre filter, I get close to 0 tds.
I think the larger units with 3 canisters have 1 that just uses carbon.
I got a smaller unit because I have limited space under my sink.

amanda
9th Dec 2010, 02:01 AM
thanks triplexx.:)
i shall have another look at the discus site and see which to choose.

countcoco
9th Dec 2010, 04:24 AM
You should base your search on how much ro water you'll need each week. If you need a lot, then I would recommend a larger unit with a higher output, otherwise you'll have to leave it running for hours or days on end.

I have used a cheap coralife ro unit (~$120 shipped) for the past three months and at present, the water it produces has a TDS of 8-10.

amanda
9th Dec 2010, 05:02 PM
thanks countcoco.
i am looking at one that does 50 gallons a day at the moment cost at 80 ish. do i just connect to the mains or do i have to buy special pumps etc for pushing it through? as water pressure over here is not very high.

countcoco
10th Dec 2010, 08:15 AM
thanks countcoco.
i am looking at one that does 50 gallons a day at the moment cost at 80 ish. do i just connect to the mains or do i have to buy special pumps etc for pushing it through? as water pressure over here is not very high.

Hmmm....... I'm not sure, but probably not. Pressure will build as the unit fills with water. I don't think it's possible to add pumps to an ro unit, unless perhaps you're a plumber. Maybe if you email the company they can give you an estimate of the minimum psi to run the unit. Or you could just make sure you purchase it from a seller that has a good return policy and send it back if the pressure is insufficient.

My water pressure is quite variable because I live in an apartment complex with old plumbing. Sometimes the pressure gets pretty low and the ro unit always churns out water.

TripleLexx
12th Dec 2010, 08:52 PM
thanks countcoco.
i am looking at one that does 50 gallons a day at the moment cost at 80 ish. do i just connect to the mains or do i have to buy special pumps etc for pushing it through? as water pressure over here is not very high.

Amanda,

50 gallons should be fine, like I said though you prob want a tank to connect to it. It takes ages and otherwise you'll need to do something like have a trailing hose to a bucket for hours to fill your tanks.
You won't need a pump if you stick in all under your sink.
You get a "saddle" that you use to connect to the cold water pipe under your sink, you then need to drill a hole in your waste pipe for the waste water and connect the hoses to the various bits.
It sounds a pain but you don't really need to be a plumber to do it.
Just make sure you switch the water off!! :D
They should come with instructions.
The hardest bit is connecting to the mains, they'll prob give you a cheap copper saddle and a this will leak if you don't tighten it properly. More expensive ones you can get are a lot easier to install.
You'd prob need to order it seperately online (self-piercing saddle).
If your unit does not come with a tank you can get one easily online as well as long as it's got the right connection you'll be fine.
It was a bit of hastle getting a tank and the filter under my tiny worktop but I use it a lot so I really need the tank.
To connect the tank I got a bit more water hose and ran it from the filter over my fridge to the other cupboard and drilled a hole in the side to feed the pipe through.
All in all took an evening, mostly cause I had to deal with leaks from the cheap saddle but it's been working fine now for over 6 months, I try and keep it at around 50psi, I think that's what they recommend, so I have to keep the flow quite low.