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icecube
29th Jan 2010, 11:33 AM
As the topic reads, i would like to know what are the different ways and the best way to remove hair algae from moss. I cant use any algae removers in the the tank as the shrimps might take an adverse effect.
So any good techniques to get rid of hair algae from moss??:bs_help:

imke_j
29th Jan 2010, 12:21 PM
I know this techniques which I find trustfoll: 1. Using a pair of tweezers every other day and remove the algae manually, 2. making a black cure for three days (the tank is totally covered and has no light so algae will die), 3. using fertilizer regulary and focus on the plants which should grow, 4. introducing fast growing plants.

billb
29th Jan 2010, 11:52 PM
Imke has provided the best method. It might take several 3 day black outs to accomplish your goal.

Can you remove the moss from the tank? If it is attched to something you can take out, then you can soak the moss in a 1 to 1 mixture of water and hydrogen peroxide for 1 or two minutes. Rinse in fresh water to remove the peroxide and then return to the tank. To be certain that you moss will handle the treatment, take a small sample and test it first!

icecube
30th Jan 2010, 10:44 PM
thanks for the response guys, will surely try it out

Bumple
9th Mar 2010, 09:36 PM
Am also having hair algae problem, and I'm thinking I'm going to try the blackout idea. But I was wondering; My females just got their first ever eggs - will the blackout have any negative effect on them? I would hate to do anything that would compromise the success of their young hatching - especially the first berried females I've ever had!

guppies
10th Mar 2010, 11:04 PM
You need to pay attention to the CO2 level when performing a black out. 1 of my CRS and 1 apple snail died after 36 hour black out, a few CRS appeared very weak, so I stopped and performed a 20% water change. 3 more died 2 or 3 days later. 1 was berried, I took the eggs out and trying to artificially hatch them. One good thing was the hair algae are dying ... lighter color, and the shrimps are eating them.

RoryM
11th Mar 2010, 08:15 AM
Easiest way to prevent it is by buying a cheap timer and running your lights for only 10 hours a day. Most mosses could be grown in a bucket with low light. I have mine setup so they turn on at 8:00am, run till noon then off for 1 hour.(siesta time!) Come back on at 1pm and run till 8pm. I have thrown java moss into a bucket and forgot about it with some water, it still grew. Moss is a simple plant so keep it simple...

retardo
17th Mar 2010, 09:58 AM
You need to pay attention to the CO2 level when performing a black out. 1 of my CRS and 1 apple snail died after 36 hour black out, a few CRS appeared very weak, so I stopped and performed a 20% water change. 3 more died 2 or 3 days later. 1 was berried, I took the eggs out and trying to artificially hatch them. One good thing was the hair algae are dying ... lighter color, and the shrimps are eating them.

When doing a blackout CO2 should be off. With no lights, plants aren't photosynthesizing and do not make use of the carbon.

Another mechanical method you can try is to use an uncontaminated mascara brush (the free ones you get at women's makeup boutiques/stands at the mall) and twirl it around. The brush will snag the algae out.

But the primary way to get rid of algae for good is to find the right balance of nutrients, CO2, and light. If your lights are high output for the tank and nutrients and CO2 are low, it is a recipe for algae. Think of lights as the engine of a car. The higher you rev, the faster you go, but without the right amount of oil to keep the engine running smooth, you may just bust the car.

retardo
17th Mar 2010, 10:02 AM
Easiest way to prevent it is by buying a cheap timer and running your lights for only 10 hours a day. Most mosses could be grown in a bucket with low light. I have mine setup so they turn on at 8:00am, run till noon then off for 1 hour.(siesta time!) Come back on at 1pm and run till 8pm. I have thrown java moss into a bucket and forgot about it with some water, it still grew. Moss is a simple plant so keep it simple...

A timer by itself is not a way to prevent algae. It is a way to control the photoperiod, yes, but will not prevent anything unless everything else is in order.

guppies
17th Mar 2010, 09:15 PM
oh I had the CO2 system off, these were CO2 coming from the plants and shrimps.

Red Bee Shrimp Fan
18th Mar 2010, 01:16 AM
What worked well for me was to increase CO2 by keeping it on all the time and adding a small army of Japonica/Amano shrimp. This method would be best applied to less inbred shrimp species.

I would not use this method with high grade CRS/CBS or variants, Black and Blue Tigers and definitely not with any Sulawesi shrimp. I would not use this method for growout/breeding tanks as the Amanos may develop a taste for shrimplets and will eventuall y outcompete other adults for food. The only exception would be for Cherry shrimp or variants within this species. These shrimp are super prolific and can compete with Amanos for food :)!

Hopefully this is helpful.

Stuart

eagle167
18th Mar 2010, 03:04 AM
I tried removing the hair algae with a new hard bristed toothbrush. It worked to a certain extent but in the end it was easier just to cut/pull off the affected pieces.

btan
19th Mar 2010, 12:30 PM
When I had black brush algae growing on the tips of my hairgrass, I just trimmed the tops of the grass. Have you tried using Seachem Excel? I have read that the formaldehyde contained in Seachem Excel has algaecidal properties. Seachem Excel in large doses can definitely fill your fauna though.

mlgt
7th Apr 2010, 09:27 PM
So the idea is completly in the dark and the hair algae will just go? or will it make it easier to pull off?

I have some growing on a slate of fissidens, but didnt want to remove too much as it was stuck onto the slate.

I will try this tonight my desk drawer as its dark in there :)

Will review this in 3 days time!

brt_p
11th Jul 2010, 08:51 AM
use a comb..remove the rest if u can..if u can't, go to toilet, flush it..:D
That's what i do on my willow moss..

or perhaps, if u brave enough, use Cu

(blackout might work, but sometime, it took longer than we expected)

mlgt
12th Jul 2010, 08:24 PM
Ive found patience is the key. I have a few slates of fissidens and over the last year the hair algae has taken over but I failed to sort it out first time.

So I found using an old airplane toothbrush or old unused one, just brush the hair algae and keep on twisting to pull it out.

My friend tried putting some ramshorns and various critters and it cleaned the moss up in a few weeks.

Quite impressed.

AvianAquatics
16th Jul 2010, 11:34 AM
I use a method similar to the black out. Just remove the moss, put it into a plastic bag with a bunch of trumpet snails and I just leave it in a dark place for weeks. The algae will die off and the snail will help to eat it. Then afterward give it a good rinse and the moss is ready for your tank!

HYUN007
3rd Aug 2010, 01:36 PM
No snails that eat algae hair???

lmhllc
29th Sep 2010, 12:55 AM
AZOO brush algae killer will help. Try it out, 2 drops for every 100l of water. You will see the result in 2 weeks

Shrimpnairf
4th Oct 2010, 06:24 AM
I think that you must control the food that the hair algea is consuming, that means that you must introduce more plants to consume the plant food being produced, fast growing plants like hornwort or duckweed, as they all consume sugars in the water and co2, takin the carbon molecule and releasing the oxygen as a byproduct. The growth of hair algea usually means that you do not have enough plants in there. you can try some banana plants as they will gather and store the nutrients, slower growing plants typically do not consune co2 as fast as you might think. you can also try some mangrove plant, as they do well in keepin the Freshwater tanks nitrogen and ammonia levels at zero. Thus keepin algea from growin, see im the opposite as you cause, i have so many plants, its hard for me to grow algea for the algea residents. Just keep taking the long strands out as the new plants grow and the algea will subside. anyway i hope this helps. - Shrimpnairf

icecube
23rd Jan 2011, 02:38 AM
to remove the hair algae from the moss, i did u 4 day black out with 30% water change every day for these 4 days and then performed a 70% water change, i switched on the lights on the 5th day and did a 40% water change, all the hair algae was gone by the 6th day, my tank is a non co2 tank, no ferts, with just some cherry shrimps. the technique of black out for 4 days with water changes worked for me.

MananaP
23rd Jan 2011, 05:05 AM
Best way i found is introducing a bunch of hungry amanos to the tank...

icecube
23rd Jan 2011, 12:24 PM
amanos didnt help in my case, i gave what my practical experience was

MananaP
23rd Jan 2011, 02:46 PM
amanos didnt help in my case, i gave what my practical experience was

That's why you have to starve them for a week, put them in the tank and don't feed the tank for 3-5 days.

murival
14th Feb 2011, 05:33 PM
prevention is better then cure! make sure your co2 levels are sufficient!and an over dose of flourish excel might do the trick!