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Crazy4Shrimps
23rd Apr 2009, 09:45 PM
I have a lot of algae on the glass of my tank. All sorts of colours. I have brown ones, turquoise green, dark green, light brown....

How do I get rid of it. Scrubbing every week doesn't seem to help. This is a shrimp tank so no fertiliser has been dosed.

I don't on my light very much and it is in the middle of the living room some distance from the window so moderate sunlight given....

What could be the issue?
Oh yah... is algae harmful to shrimps?

Justin12345
23rd Apr 2009, 10:05 PM
it isnt at all.
and is your tank exposed to sunlight alot?
get ottos or borneo suckers(just heard of it)

louuu
23rd Apr 2009, 11:00 PM
I have a lot of algae on the glass of my tank. All sorts of colours. I have brown ones, turquoise green, dark green, light brown....

How do I get rid of it. Scrubbing every week doesn't seem to help. This is a shrimp tank so no fertiliser has been dosed.

I don't on my light very much and it is in the middle of the living room some distance from the window so moderate sunlight given....

What could be the issue?
Oh yah... is algae harmful to shrimps?

try getting a snail from 1 of your kaki... i used to have similar issues in all my tanks until i got a couple of some snails from my neighbor's tanks... drop one each into the tanks and after a few weeks they multiplied... they do all the tank glass cleaning ever since... :D

dun ask me the names of the snails... i have not seen it sold in stores... maybe cos they are not really attractive with those vibrant colors... they appear dull colored except for their gold/black shells...

here's a pic... sorry for the lousy quality... :embarasse

2015

retardo
24th Apr 2009, 01:26 AM
What is your water change routine? Do you dose any ferts for your plants or anything? What about CO2? Have you identified any of the algae?

Telling us the color doesn't really help as far as advice goes. Not all types of algae have the same cause and most definitely not the same solution. For example, blue-green algae (dark-green, slimy and smelly) is caused by bacteria and no living creature (snail, oto, shrimp, etc.) will touch it. You need to combat it with an anti-biotic (I believe, something containing erythromycin). Brown dust algae (diatoms) can easily be dealt with by adding otos to your tank. Black brush algae is a result of poor CO2 circulation and can be combatted with H2O2 (peroxide) and a black out period.

So provide more details, otherwise, you're shooting arrows in the dark.

Crazy4Shrimps
24th Apr 2009, 01:32 PM
Have you identified any of the algae?
Hmmm not quite an algae expert myself so can't identify any of the algae.

What is your water change routine?
20% weekly

Do you dose any ferts for your plants or anything?
No fertiliser no CO2 also

My tanks have been wipped clean of snails ever since I started keeping Anentome Helenas. Think have to purchase from aquarium shops...

retardo
24th Apr 2009, 01:54 PM
Still no info, so no way to help you. I would suggest you do a google search and find out what algaes you have. A good number of sites have pictures you can use for reference.

kokon2208
24th Apr 2009, 07:43 PM
If you want to get rid of algae quickly you may use Glutaraldehyde which seems to be traded as Cidex by J&J in the dosage of 20ml/100l.
http://www.legmed.ru/catalogue/data/images/rQb9Z86F.jpg
Your (all kinds of) algae will be totaly eliminated within 1-2 weeks. But if you dont eliminate the cause for growing algae you will see them soon again.

noobsheep
24th Apr 2009, 11:47 PM
hi, kokon2208.
the product mentioned above, is it safe in a shrimp tank?
im having hair algae problem.
those long types that looks like hair. which can stretch to about 6~8cm upwards daily. of cause its also all around my spikey and java mosses.
so im doing cleaning everyday, but im not solving the root of the problem. anyone?

louuu
25th Apr 2009, 01:47 AM
u can check here (http://www.otocinclus.com/articles/algae.html) to see wat type of algae is in ur tank...

Crazy4Shrimps
26th Apr 2009, 02:38 PM
Gotten rid of my irritating algae problem!
Just bought a few pieces of Horned Nerite snails and threw it into the snail.
Wa laa.... they went to work almost immediately and 1/4 of the algae has been removed... :D

Frank
26th Apr 2009, 03:05 PM
A natural solution is always to prefer. :)
However, something is not balanced when you have so many algaes and you should still search for the reasons.

Crazy4Shrimps
26th Apr 2009, 03:45 PM
Still have not really figured out the reason. Probably should step up on my weekly routine of changing water. Haven't been very consistent sometimes due to my schedule recently.

noobsheep
26th Apr 2009, 09:59 PM
hmm, how do we make sure that everything is balanced ?

kokon2208
27th Apr 2009, 01:48 PM
Noobsheep, it is absolutely save for shrimps in the dosage mentioned above.

noobsheep
27th Apr 2009, 01:56 PM
alright, thanks alot man!
but does it solve hair algae problem?

kokon2208
28th Apr 2009, 03:32 PM
You will kill all your algae but they will come again if you dont reach the balance in your tank. And how to do that - there is too little info on your tank.

retardo
28th Apr 2009, 03:55 PM
There is a definite imbalance in your tank that is causing the algae to bloom. Algae are plants as well and have the same basic requirements as other aquatic plants: water, light and nutrients. Excess of any of the last two will most assuredly cause algae to grow.

There are a few simple things you can do to battle the algae. You can lower the photoperiod (the amount of time) your lights are on (e.g., blackouts), move your tank away from direct sunlight, reduce the amount of food you feed your fish/shrimp, remove extra nutrients from the water by doing water changes, add fast growing stem plants to your tank to outcompete the algae for nutrients, and add some algae eating animals to your tank.

Try a few of these different methods in conjunction with one another and see what happens.

kokon2208
28th Apr 2009, 04:36 PM
in short:
if you have black brush algae - you have too much nitrate in your tank. The mainstream in the case - stop feeding them (move your nitrate level to 10-20 mg/l with constant water changing, reduce feeding your fishes, get rid of currents, add fast growing plants) and create favourable conditions for platns (your light exposure must respond to your plants demands, your CO level must be enough to provide feeding for your plants and so on). Black brush is the most vulnarable algae to Cidex. Normally it dies within 3-4 days with dosage of 20ml/100l.
if you have blue-green algae - you have too little nitrate level. They like phosphats. In such a case plants stop consuming phosphats from the water (due to too small nitrate concentration). But the algae (actually bacteria) can easily grow without nitrate consuming only phosphates. Kill em with erithromicine (0,1g/10-20l) and then keep your nitrate at 10-20 mg/l.

ndrake
5th Jun 2009, 08:46 PM
i heard that amano shrimp eats the algae very well.
Imo a biological "weapon" is always better than a chemical one hehe.

a1matt
5th Jun 2009, 09:05 PM
Amano will eat most algae, but not BBA.
Siamese Algae Eater will eat BBA.

As different algaes have different causes, it is important to ascertain what algae you have before you can rectify it.

There is an excellent guide to algae here:

http://theplantedtank.co.uk/algae.htm

Ghanguss
5th Jun 2009, 10:45 PM
Once you lighting gets above 2 watts per gallon you should have co2. Also a 1-2 hour dark period in the middle of the day will reduce algae too.