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jjkolodz
12th Jul 2007, 05:12 AM
Can anyone help?

My tap water readings are
TDS: 61 ppm
pH: 7.91
GH: 2
KH: 2-3

I treated this water with Kent Neutral Controller which is supposed to buffer to 7 and soften the water.

Now my readings are
TDS: 175 ppm
pH: 7.41
GH: 1-2
KH: 5

I am assuming that there must be something in my tap water that is buffering the pH.

Anyone have any recommendations?

jjkolodz
12th Jul 2007, 05:13 AM
Or can anyone explain to me what is happening

Moses703
12th Jul 2007, 10:45 AM
I don't know what's in the kent neutral buffering chemical, but

if you are trying to make water for shrimps there should be

careful about using chemicals.


I recommand you to get API PH down (sulfuric acid) and

give good airation for coupledays and it will lower the ph.

Sulfuric acid is very strong so you won't use the water till you test it

with blackworm or daphnia or what ever.

But after it is completely mixed and not activive, it will not only

lower the Ph, but help with ecosystem in the tank.

Aquaticculture
12th Jul 2007, 01:07 PM
I too am facing some water issue. :cry: Any idea what is the preferred range for our water? In terms of,

TDS:
pH:
GH:
KH:

Or is there any I left out?

Thanks...

Zebrapl3co
12th Jul 2007, 10:28 PM
One natural what to lower your pH is to use peatmoss. Buy a cheese cloth from a dollar store (if you have one in your country) or a grocery store. Fill it up with peatmoss. Put it in a bucket and pour hot water into the bucket. Them swosh the sack of peatmoss back and forth just like you are mixing a tea bag. Sqush it a bit. Then trash the peatmoss, or you can dump it into your garden, it'll eventually become a good fertilizer too.
As for the black water, that's instant pH lower agent. Mix it with your tank water until you get what you wanted.
Oh and you tds will definately go up. If your tank is CO2 injected. I'd be very careful. But if it was CO2 injected, you pH shouldn't be so high in the first place.

Moses703
12th Jul 2007, 11:36 PM
You must not rely upon only mesurements of water.

When I first started raising shrimps I was so fixated

on water mesurements, but the main key to the safe water

is old natural water.

water that went through good bio cycle, airation, good amount

of DOC(dead organic carbon).

A way to achieve this kind of water is to take time

and keep water with plants.

jjkolodz
13th Jul 2007, 12:08 AM
Aquaticculture
I believe the ideal conditions are these (from what I have read one here and other forums):
TDS: 150-220 ppm
pH: 6.5-7.2
KH: 1-6 dH
GH: 4-6 dH

Please correct me if I am wrong.

Moses703
Kent Neutral Controller is a phosphate buffering agent. It was recommended to me by another shrimp keeper. I tested a high dosages of it on some cherry shrimp and it seems to have no effect on them.

I have used the pH Down product to adjust the pH of the water... but the pH fluctuates a lot.




The real problem that I am dealing with is keeping my pH from fluctuating. I would add a bit of crushed coral but I am worried about increasing my GH and KH. Also, I am trying to bring my pH down... crushed coral would raise that.

How stable is the pH in peat treated water?

retardo
13th Jul 2007, 12:59 AM
If your goal is to lower pH, crushed coral should not be used. Use peat. Put the peat into a filterbag and put it inside your filter (I'm assuming canister here). Peat has natural tannins that will leech out into the water and lower the pH. Natural driftwood will have tannins as well and also have the same effect. Both, however, will turn add a tinge of yellow/brown to your water. Adding a 100mL bag of Purigen will remove the coloration, but does not affect the pH. I would avoid adding any chemicals to adjust anything in your tank.

I also agree with Moses' comments about not worrying about water parameters that much. Concentrate on keeping your water conditions stable more than anything else. The more you tinker with the water, the less you know about it affects the inhabitants, IMO.

Aquaticculture
13th Jul 2007, 09:41 AM
Thanks jjkolodz.... to maintain your PH, why not consider the usage of a PH controller. It uses CO2 to lower your ph and shouldn't affect your other parameters.

jjkolodz
14th Jul 2007, 02:34 AM
I got some peat and I've been cycling some aquarium water with it and it seems to be bringing the pH down. Do I have to worry about it decreasing the pH too much.

Zebrapl3co
17th Jul 2007, 01:00 AM
As long as it's above 6.2 ph it should be fine. It takes alot to lower 7.9 to 6.2, and if you didn't use any Purigen, it will be easy to tell if you're over doing it by look at the colour of the water. If it gets darker then that last time you test the water, then you need to check it again. If the colour is about the same as the last time you look at it, then it should be fine.

jojoecute
8th Aug 2007, 10:43 PM
i used PH buffer powder 6.5 to keep aged water, so anytime i had
PH6.5 water to use...

So far so good ...