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View Full Version : Jumping in to Golden Bees any Tips?



RyeGuy711
8th Nov 2014, 12:06 AM
So I am new to shrimping 5months and have so far only kept neos. I had a bumpy start with deaths in one of the tanks but seem to have figured the problem out and now have tons of shrimplets and many berried as well. I bought a 12" rimless cube and have decided to go with golden bees. Any suggestions for a first timer making the jump from neos? I have an HOB filter combined with corner sponge filter 50w heater dual led lamps and 4kg of up aqua shrimp sand. I have hard tap water of 9 gh and 8 kh and ph 7.6 but through some experimenting I think half tap half RO combined with substrate will get me to the correct hardness and ph. I'm filling the tank up tonight and will check the water after a few days. I was planning on cycling for 1-2 months. I have had the filter sponges in the compartment of a fully cycled tank for the last couple weeks. Any suggestions or tips for a newb?

RyeGuy711
11th Nov 2014, 12:02 AM
Im going to reply to myself with some advice. Up Aqua Shrimp Sand does not buffer water PH dont use it for this purpose. Half of the reviews I have read about it said it did nothing other than being inert. The other half were glowing reviews touting its buffering capability to keep at PH of 6.5. Well the tank has been set up for a few days, the water was 3 gallons RO mixed with about 2.5g tap water with 7.6 PH. Now after running its 7.4PH with GH- 3 and KH-3. Seems like it does practically nothing for the PH. So in retrospect I should have bought ADA Amazonia instead to make sure PH was correct. The UP Aqua shrimp sand looks great and is very clean upon set up with no ammonia spike and does seem to soften the water very slightly. It would be fine for Neos but using it for that purpose it is very exspensive for a practically inert substrate.

hyoushoku
11th Nov 2014, 12:24 PM
Hi,

Most shrimp specialised aqua soil does not have strong buffering capability like ADA AS. They are designed based on shrimp keepers are using 100% RO water + salt. This is also the reason why I never use shrimp specialty aqua soil; you pay more and get less. :p

ADA AS's strong buffering capability also has a fault. As the buffering capability is so strong, you will need water with higher alkalinity during the first couple of months. Usually, I add a small bag of aragonite or alkaline buffering filter media to neutralise it.

One thing to clarify. ADA AS does not contain ammonia. It contains ammonium, which is harmless if the pH is below 6.4. When pH goes above 6.4, then it will slowly convert into free ammonia. As long as it is not above pH 6.8, the amount of free ammonia is very little and may not even detectable (unless you have a lot of ammonium).

Back to you problem. To fix your problem, why don't you switch to use 100% RO + salt that contains zero alkaline substance. Most shrimp-specialised RO replenishing salt that are for soft-water shrimp, don't contain alkaline substance, except SaltyShrimp GH+. I find that soft-water shrimps can live in wide range of pH, even those sensitive type. Hence, don't worry too much on the pH. However, like I mentioned above about the free ammonia equilibrium. Therefore, just keep them in pH between 6.0 to 6.8 will be a better choice.

RyeGuy711
11th Nov 2014, 11:10 PM
Thank you very much for the reply that helps me a great deal. I really did not want to remove and replace the substrate in a tank that I have already started cycling. I did not even consider remineralizing. I have read multiple times how using mixed tap water is preferred to remineralizing. But I like your suggestion much better it is cheaper and it sounds like I can avoid substrate resets every year or two. I also really like the size and look of the Shrimp Sand. So what kind of remineralizer would you reccomend? Were you saying Salty Shrimp is a good one or is there a better option?

Ryan

hyoushoku
11th Nov 2014, 11:29 PM
"I have read multiple times how using mixed tap water is preferred to remineralizing." <--- This only works if you have soft water. Based on what you narrated, your water is not soft at all.

"But I like your suggestion much better it is cheaper and it sounds like I can avoid substrate resets every year or two." <--- All type of substrates, including ADA AS, will be exhausted after a few months. It is the waste from your shrimps, fishes and plants that fell into the substrate regenerate the humus substance and buffer the water virtually forever.

"So what kind of remineralizer would you reccomend? Were you saying Salty Shrimp is a good one or is there a better option?" <--- Hard for me to recommend. I used to use commercial RO remineraliser and none of them able to fulfill what I wanted, which is balanced nutrients. At the end, I developed my own. I have been using my own remineraliser for more than a year. If you are not having heavily planted tank and you are not having high grade shrimps, any commercial shrimp remineraliser are fine. However, shrimp remineraliser usually short of trace elements and you will need to dose thsoe trace fertiliser that is for planted tank.

RyeGuy711
11th Nov 2014, 11:36 PM
Thanks again for the tips. I have been reading everything shrimp related for months and every time I attempt to do something I feel like I dont know anything. I appreciate the advice and also enjoy reading the articles on your website.

Ryan

hyoushoku
11th Nov 2014, 11:48 PM
You are welcome. Feel free to ping me if you have any question. ;)

Liger
17th Jan 2015, 05:10 AM
Great info