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Mischy
29th May 2006, 09:26 PM
Hello,

in Germany nearly the whole mosses you can buy are named "Javamoos" but today I have had a second look to my mosses and now I'd like to know, what species they might be. I foun two different looking species and I'm relatively sure, that these are not Javamosses.

Hopefully you can tell me what species this are. The left one might be Christmas Moss, but the right one I can't identify.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v311/Michi2005/DSC00020.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v311/Michi2005/DSC00022.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v311/Michi2005/DSC00026.jpg


Thank you very much :)

regards Michael

Robert
30th May 2006, 12:07 AM
Hi Michael,
I'm not sure about the moss on the left side of your picture. The moss on the right side seems to be a Versicularia species, probably it is Versicularia dubyana, Singapore Moss. This species is not that rare in Germany. The problem is that every kind of moss which looks slightly like a Taxiphyllum or Versicularia species gets the name "Java Moss".

best regards
Robert

Missi3ellie
30th May 2006, 01:34 AM
I'm just curious, just how many types of moss are there? Beside x'mas, java, taiwan ... how do we differenciate? I have the moss (on the right) which i scrapped some off from a rock next to my pond, they don't seem to be growing faster than the java .

puzzled :shocked:

bjar
30th May 2006, 02:41 AM
It migth be christmas moss.

Robert
30th May 2006, 07:01 AM
I'm just curious, just how many types of moss are there? ...
puzzled :shocked:

Hi,
I'm not sure how many moss species are availble at the moment. I would say there are at least a dozen species of at least 4 genera (Versicularia, Taxiphyllum, Drepanocladus and Fontinalis). There are also several liverworts e.g. Riccia fluitans, Monosolenium tenerum ...I kept and keep so far about 15 moss and liverwort species myself. In another international forum, which is actually a place for killie fish keepers and breeders, there are some very good threads about aquatic mosses, too. I mean killies.com. This article by Prof. Benito Tan is also quite helpful: http://sea.nus.edu.sg/aquatic-mosses.pdf It has a size of 6.80MB.

best regards

Robert

Mischy
1st Jun 2006, 12:47 AM
Thank you for your answer :)
but how can I grow them to look best? At the moment, they are just swimming in the water, but I have no experience in growing mosses right... :(
Maybe you can help me :)

Thank you very much!
best regards

Michael

Robert
1st Jun 2006, 03:20 AM
Hi,
to grow mosses fast and nice is quite easy. All you need are water-temperatures of 20-26C and low till medium light conditions. Add regularly a bit liquid fertilizer and extra CO2. I use pressurized CO2 and it helps a lot. Most mosses and liverworts (in German "Lebermoose") seem to grow better if you tie them onto a piece of wood or stone. I use thin, light brown nylon fishing line to tie them onto driftwood pieces. After a few weeks the line is no longer visible on the first gaze.
Be careful and don't add too much light and fertilizer or else you will get algae. Mosses and liverworts prefer shady places in nature and even in our tanks they grow better under medium light conditions (e.g. 0.4-0.6Watt/liter) than under high light conditions (e.g. 1Watt/liter).

best regards

Robert

Mischy
1st Jun 2006, 04:06 AM
hi,

thank you very much! The next tank will be a moss-tank so I'll try this out!
But how can I build a moss-wall??

best regards

Michael

Mischy
1st Jun 2006, 07:44 PM
I found something by using googel! No need to answer it :)

best regards,

Michael

Mischy
29th Jul 2006, 05:51 AM
Hey guys,

I really, really like the different moss-types, so I went on "moss-hunting" ;) I found many different species, all were named "javamoss" but as you can see, most of them look very different. I would only say, that they look similar without my glasses ;)

But I am not sure, which species this are, I hope you can help me identify! :)

All together:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v311/Michi2005/DSC01333.jpg

Moss #1, maybe Giant Moss or Java Moss?
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v311/Michi2005/Moos1.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v311/Michi2005/Moos1-1.jpg

Moss #2, maybe Singapoore Moss?
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v311/Michi2005/Moos2.jpg

Moss #3, maybe Stringy Moss?
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v311/Michi2005/Moos3.jpg

Moss #4, maybe Taiwan Moss?
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v311/Michi2005/Moos4.jpg

Moss #5 maybe Christmas Moss?
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v311/Michi2005/moos5.jpg

Robert
29th Jul 2006, 07:44 AM
Hi,
it is almost impossible to determine a moss species with the help of a few pictures. Without information about the origin and the help of a microscope, I can just try to guess which genus they belong to.

Moss number one is a Taxiphyllum species. Moss number two is probably a Vesicularia species. The third moss is probably Leptodictyum riparium or Amblystegium serpens. I would say it is Amblystegium serpens but I can't be sure. The other two mosses are probably Taxiphyllum species, too.

regards

Robert

Mischy
29th Jul 2006, 08:05 AM
Hello Robert,

thanks for your impression :)
Your definitively right, I see, that it's nearly like with the different types of Shrimps, no one knows exactly what it is, without having a closer look with the microscope! Another difficultie is that the most pages, where you can read something about unknown mosses, are written in english :(

best regards,
Michael

Robert
29th Jul 2006, 08:10 PM
Hi Michael,
the English language is no problem for me and I know most articles about mosses. I kept about 15 moss and liverwort species so far and still keep some of them. So I know how most of the nowadays common species look like under different conditions. Under very well conditions you can really see the differences clearly but in a low light tank without extra CO2 and so on even Taiwan Moss looks like ordinary Java Moss. Another problem is that we have much more unknown species in the hobby than identified ones. Even in Germany there are a good half dozen species, although most of them are just called "Java Moss". So what you can easily do is to identify the genus but that's it.

regards

Robert

Mischy
29th Jul 2006, 11:07 PM
Hi Robert,

i meant, that for me it's difficult to understand it! I can see them live in my tanks so it might be possible for me to identify them, but I don't know really what the differences are. :(

greetings