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View Full Version : Berried rili care?



lucyholland
17th Apr 2013, 03:02 AM
Hi everyone

What a great forum :)

Having spent a while searching round I can't find any info on specialist care for rili carrying eggs? (or I could have been looking in the wrong place?!)

I have a female carrying eggs, do I need to separate her and is the any special feeding routine?
I've only had rilis a few weeks and I'm a bit of a novice so I'm sorry if this info is posted elsewhere?

Thanks in advance

Lucy

Asphalt art
17th Apr 2013, 09:58 AM
Continue caring for the shrimp as though she didn't have any eggs. There is no special feeding for her specifically, and do not increase her stress level by changing water parameters any.

That being said it is possible for her to become over-stressed and drop her eggs (no longer carry to birth), but don't worry about that one too much. If she does drop her eggs before you start to see the 2 little black eyes in each egg (a sign that they are soon to birth) it can be normal as well. Just like a human can have a "miscarriage" they can as well from time to time, especially if it is their first spawn.

In all, don't fret, and ensure that you have a well cycled tank with a healthy biofilm. That is what your little ones are going to feed on naturally until they get a little bigger.

lucyholland
25th Apr 2013, 07:40 AM
Thanks Asphalt :)

I have 4 berried rili in total now so I'm hoping for the pitter patter of little shrimplets soon :)

The only thing I have done is moved the corys to my other tank as they're a little 'bull in a china shop' ish and I don't want the females bashed about.

Thanks again :)

Asphalt art
25th Apr 2013, 10:35 AM
Moving the vacuum cleaners was probably a good idea, although I don't keep anything other than shrimp and plants in my tanks to avoid issues.

Baby shrimplets are almost invisible even on a whitish background, it will depend on your substrate and plant density if you get a chance to see them. You could search for them for an hour and not see one, then one day you might see a couple. It is a complete crapshoot. I will dig through some pics to show you how hard they are to see and post it here for you next to Sakura/PFR (.75")(2CM) take your pick of favorite measurements. They look like organic debris with 2 spots. This particular one I am talking about hitchhiked a ride on some Hydroctyle Japan I received from the same guy as the PFR/Sakura shipment.



Thanks Asphalt :)

I have 4 berried rili in total now so I'm hoping for the pitter patter of little shrimplets soon :)

The only thing I have done is moved the corys to my other tank as they're a little 'bull in a china shop' ish and I don't want the females bashed about.

Thanks again :)

Asphalt art
25th Apr 2013, 10:53 AM
There is a baby there. Substrate is U.P. Aqua Micro Shrimp Sand for reference, grains are <1mm in size. Camera is an old Konica Minolta Dimage Z1 (at a whopping 3.2MP) It was hot back in the day, but lacks when comparing it to a modern DSLR.

7386

hyoushoku
25th Apr 2013, 10:47 PM
Hi Lucy,

Care for Rili shrimp is very similar to Red Cherry Shrimp (aka RCS) or its different grades (Sakura and PFR). Thus, you can look for those information easily off this forum or Google it.

Do the berried shrimps hide frequently? If yes, you may want to provide her food near her hiding place and dim the light a bit.

If your water temperature is at 24 degree C, the eggs should hatch within 28 days.

lucyholland
27th Apr 2013, 06:43 AM
Thanks for all the advice :)

The berried ones tend to all stick in the same plant so it's quite easy to keep an eye on them (at the moment) I can see I'm gonna need some glasses to see the babies tho!!
Is it worth transferring them to a floating hatchery when I can see eyes in the egg or when the saddle starts coming back to keep the babies in one place or will that just stress them out too much?

As soon as there any signs of shrimplets i'll try and get some pics, my 'thing' is aviation photography so using the macro for the shrimps will be a whole new adventure :)


xx

Asphalt art
27th Apr 2013, 08:32 AM
I took another pic today that will give you a good idea. Same substrate as above.

7391

hyoushoku
27th Apr 2013, 11:28 AM
If you just want to see shrimplet, you don't need a hatchery tank, unless your tank are heavily planted with. Maybe I have trained eyes but I can even spot babies within my 60cm cube tank. The trick is to monitor the mummies whether the eggs have eyes. Once they have eyes, the babies should be hatching in a week or two times. After that, monitor the mummies for eggs getting lesser than it is the time for "treasure hunt", which is the most fun part of shrimp keeping especially it is a new breed you just got. A good magnifying glass will help.

Also take note that a lot of the time, when the baby is hatch, they will be violently swim out of the eggs and swim / blown to the glass of the tank. Thus, if you see a debris stick to the tank glass, look closely and it might be a new born.

Below is a picture of a newly borned BKK (about a week old) for your reference (need to zoom in an see):
7392

Usually, it looks like a piece of tiny plastic on the gravel or plant. Rili baby is more tough to spot as it is almost total transparent. But if you have moss that are shaded in your tank, it will be easily spotted as all of them will hide at moss area (except if they hide in flame moss then almost impossible to spot).

lucyholland
15th May 2013, 12:10 AM
Not the greatest photo - taken on my phone but shrimplets can't be far away now??
I've brought some marimo moss ready for them.
7421

hyoushoku
15th May 2013, 12:13 AM
Looks like about berried for two to three weeks?

lucyholland
15th May 2013, 12:27 AM
26/27 days

hyoushoku
15th May 2013, 12:44 AM
Are those eyes or spots on her shell?

The eggs look big and light color. If those are eyes and with the size of the eggs, she should be hatching in a week time. When within a day or two, the eggs will shrink and darken a lot.

What's you water temperature?

lucyholland
20th May 2013, 08:51 PM
The babies are here!!!

The first ones started hatching a couple of days ago, however they were getting picked off one by one by the guppies. Transferred them to the fry tank but the same thing was happening.
Managed to save a few and transferred them and the second female into a make-shift shrimpery - a net breeder, there are more every time I look.
I am putting a tiny bit of algae wafer in for the female and a drop of liquifry in for the babies.

I've not really any idea if I'm doing right tho.

A couple of pics from the phone again - sorry for the quality.

7430

hyoushoku
20th May 2013, 09:16 PM
Congratulation!!!! That's a long but worthwhile wait. ;)

You keep guppies with shrimp??!! :x

Guppies will eat anything that can fit into their mouth, especially they have pretty big mouth. It's not a good idea to keep them together. :undecided

lucyholland
20th May 2013, 11:01 PM
To be fair to the guppies they leave the adults and smaller juveniles alone, the shrimp can be swimming past them and they won't even look at them, they seem to have the taste for shrimplets tho :(

I'll leave them where they are in the net till all remaining eggs have hatched, meanwhile I'll look into getting a nice little shrimp tank :)

Am I feeding the babies the right stuff, is there anything I can get that will help them to grow and thrive??

etcamire04
21st May 2013, 12:37 AM
There's nothing bad in keeping guppies with shrimp especially when we speak of neocaridina.

You just need a big ball of java moss or any other moss. With this, shrimplets will always have somewhere to hide if they need to. You'll certainly have a bit less mature shrimp in the end. But, neocardina shrimp like those rili breed really fast. It's not really a problem.

I had guppies during some months with my red cherry and I never see any kind of attack.

hyoushoku
21st May 2013, 03:13 AM
To be fair to the guppies they leave the adults and smaller juveniles alone, the shrimp can be swimming past them and they won't even look at them, they seem to have the taste for shrimplets tho :(

I'll leave them where they are in the net till all remaining eggs have hatched, meanwhile I'll look into getting a nice little shrimp tank :)

Am I feeding the babies the right stuff, is there anything I can get that will help them to grow and thrive??

I used to think that too. I have been keeping Pacific Blue-eyes, which has much smaller mouth than guppy, and I kept them to control little critters such as planaria and cyclops. However to my horror, a week back I saw them eating the babies and also those adolescence that is about a month old. The worst is that they are eating in my expensive Tibee tank. Each bite cost me at least EUR300. *sob sob*

Therefore, I immediately scoop them away and place it in a separated tank and planning to give away to some of the LFS I know. :(

I'm not sure baby shrimp eats liquified fry. Their main diet is micro-flora and micro-fauna, such as soft algae and any bacteria. If you can get your hand on some wheat, chorella and / or spirallina fine powder, you can feed them (tiny bit will do). These will also promote bacteria growth from uneaten food.

If you are planning for shrimp tank, avoid small tank. At least get a 60L tank and will be easier to control. Rili breed like rabbit and you will get hundreds in months. I find that it's quite inhumane to squeeze them into small area, which is why recently I upgrading all my nano tanks into midi or full size tank.

hyoushoku
21st May 2013, 03:17 AM
There's nothing bad in keeping guppies with shrimp especially when we speak of neocaridina.

You just need a big ball of java moss or any other moss. With this, shrimplets will always have somewhere to hide if they need to. You'll certainly have a bit less mature shrimp in the end. But, neocardina shrimp like those rili breed really fast. It's not really a problem.

I had guppies during some months with my red cherry and I never see any kind of attack.

No matter how they hide, once a while some adventurous babies will start swimming out, especially when they just hatch and kick out from eggs. This is the most vulnerable time. Personally, I treat every shrimp like my babies. Seeing them become someone's food will drive me nuts. :embarasse

My Mrs saw the attack a week ago and has been having nightmare of my Pacific Blue-eyes eating up all my Tibee babies.

As such, I prefer not to keep any predator with shrimp.

etcamire04
21st May 2013, 09:22 AM
That's why I don't have any in my crystals tanks ;) After all, it's more a personal choice.

lucyholland
15th Jun 2013, 07:12 AM
Hi all
Just a quick update now the shrimplets are coming upto a month old :)
Although still hiding for the majority of the time there are a select few that come out during the day, especially feeding time lol. I'm seeing more and more of them and they all look to be eating and growing well. 7501

hyoushoku
15th Jun 2013, 02:32 PM
They are forever looking so cute. :)