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betta_zoid87
14th Apr 2006, 06:40 PM
hie,i would really want to know if the above mentioned is really harmful towards shrimps? thank you....

silane
14th Apr 2006, 10:18 PM
I have yet to hear activate carbon is bad for shrimp. Maybe you or other can share with what you have heard or experienced.

babypiggy
14th Apr 2006, 10:32 PM
hie,i would really want to know if the above mentioned is really harmful towards shrimps? thank you....
Err.. I don't think so.
I use it in my canister filter for my 72 gallon bow front tank;which have shrimps in it.

Jenova
15th Apr 2006, 01:02 PM
hie,i would really want to know if the above mentioned is really harmful towards shrimps? thank you....

I used to keep fish before I switched to shrimps. I was told that active carbon is used to remove the odour, but once the active carbon is washed out, it's best to remove it from the canister. It was believe to house harmful bacteria if prolong use. Not sure how true.

Regards,
John

myrontay
15th Apr 2006, 06:37 PM
I used to keep fish before I switched to shrimps. I was told that active carbon is used to remove the odour, but once the active carbon is washed out, it's best to remove it from the canister. It was believe to house harmful bacteria if prolong use. Not sure how true.

Regards,
JohnActive carbon has very small holes that can trap very small organic particles. Once those holes are filled up, essentially active carbon has served its purpose and may be removed. If it is not removed, it is just like any other rock in your aquarium which serves as a platform for beneficial bacteria to grow. However, there are better media you could use to house your beneficial bacteria by providing greater surface area for beneficial bacteria to grow on e.g. biohome.

I do not believe that active carbon is harmful to shrimps.

Missi3ellie
16th Apr 2006, 12:05 PM
can i ask a question?

Today i did a water change and discover that one of my missing tetras got stucked in the filter. so i decided to clear the mess, however i noticed that theres one layer (white color jelly stuff) on my active carbon inside the hang on filter. Is that something harmful or is it some kinda bacteria..><

my tank is only 16 days old housing 12 tetras
using ADA Africana soil

myrontay
16th Apr 2006, 01:28 PM
can i ask a question?

Today i did a water change and discover that one of my missing tetras got stucked in the filter. so i decided to clear the mess, however i noticed that theres one layer (white color jelly stuff) on my active carbon inside the hang on filter. Is that something harmful or is it some kinda bacteria..><

my tank is only 16 days old housing 12 tetras
using ADA Africana soilI would advise that it is time to remove your active carbon and replace it with biohome or other biological filter media.

defi
23rd Jan 2007, 10:00 PM
Active carbon is used for remove all the harmful substance in ur tank. Need to change it every month! Cause when it full of dirty things it is useless.

retardo
25th Jan 2007, 02:55 PM
Active carbon is most useful to remove any residual medications you may have used in your tank to treat your fish. If you have a planted tank and you add fertilizers to supplement their growth, active carbon will also remove the ferts and other dissolved organics from the water column, counteracting what you're trying to do with the ferts. As myrontay pointed out, once active carbon is fully used up, it simply becomes surface area for beneficial bacteria to grow on. It does not leech any harmful substances back into the water. That is a misnomer.

droid
7th Apr 2008, 05:20 PM
Thankyou, for saying that it will not leach the adsorbed chemicals back into your water. That statement, which I have read more than once, has never made sense to me.

Go Pens, Fish On!
andy

TitoC
8th Apr 2008, 04:49 AM
Missie, that sounds like a fungus growing off the carcass. Better fix that filter too. But at least it was fed enough ammonia to cycle! :)


About the carbon betta, if you would look up what it really is, i dont think you would be worried.
However, I don't think its usefull, aside in case of emergency or after certain treatments. If there are "harmfull substances" (metals or something?) in the tank, they are coming from somewhere in the first place, so fix the source. Especially if you are putting them yourself.
The fact that you have to replace it frequently is 1. The fact that there is no way of telling if it is working (if you even have identified any harmful substances?) is 2. The fact that so many succesful breeders do without, with just sponge filters even...
If you all add it up, tell me why you would use it? Can just as well burn a candle or something...
When you look more scientific data on activated charcoal, you see that it does not even inactivate all harmfull products. For instance ammonia is not stopped by it, unless it is specially treated to do so by adding other compounds.

eclecticoldsod
11th Apr 2008, 12:10 AM
As I never [had to] use chemical medications ever, I remove any active carbon from my filters, and replace it with inert material for beneficial bacteria to grow on – beyond the sponge filter that will catch all the 'squeeze-out' crud... Even cheap internal filters will accept this change quite happily...